Memorable! Yayuk Basuki’s style at Wimbledon 1996 praised by Vogue

London – Marking the 2022 Wimbledon tournament, Vogue magazine has listed some of the most stylish moments for women in the history of the grasscourt Grand Slam. Among the names of tennis legends perched on the list, there is senior Indonesian tennis player Yayuk Basuki who triumphed in the 90s era.

The name Yayuk Basuki coincides with world tennis icons such as Margaret Court, Billy Jean King, Pam Shriver, and Steffi Graf. In an article published on Tuesday (28/6/2022), the magazine, dubbed the ‘fashion bible’, praised their fashion style when competing at Wimbledon for being ‘memorable’ or unforgettable.

Different from the other three Grand Slams (US Open, Australian Open and Roland Garros), Wimbledon, which is held annually in London, England, requires all players, both male and female, to dress in all white when competing. However, that doesn’t mean they can’t come up with clothes that have their own charm.

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Yayuk Basuki’s appearance at Wimbledon 1996. (Photo: Clive Brunskill/Allsport/Getty Images)

Yayuk Basuki was appreciated for his outfit at Wimbledon 1996 against Romanian Ruxandra Dragomir. At that time, adidas match clothes became the mainstay of the woman who was born in Yogyakarta, November 30, 1970.

The white on white look consists of a short-sleeved V-neck top decorated with adidas’ signature three-line black motif on the collar. Meanwhile, thinner lines adorn the sleeves. Not to forget, the logo of the WTA, Women’s Tennis Association or the World Women’s Tennis Association.

The Indonesian tennis player, who first appeared at Wimbledon in 1991, then combined her top with a short skirt that fell above the knee. The A-line silhouette with pleated touch successfully exudes Yayuk Basuki’s feminine aura. A pair of earrings that look like they’re adorned with simple solitaire-cut diamonds add to her style on the court.

At Wimbledon 1996, Yayuk Basuki wore an all-white tennis shirt from adidas. (Photo: Clive Brunskill/Allsport/Getty Images)

Of course, the tennis shoes that Yayuk Basuki wears are white and the adidas brand is the same as his clothes. In addition, he completes his ‘combat’ equipment with a white hat, complete with matching hair ties.

Despite losing to Dragomir in the first round of the women’s singles event, Yayuk Basuki will still be proud of being the first Indonesian tennis player to qualify for Wimbledon.

Apart from the aesthetic that invites praise, the clothes are an important part of Indonesia’s existence in the history of world tennis.

Billy Jean King’s 1975 Wimbledon outfit that Vogue hailed as one of the most memorable styles in the history of the grasscourt Grand Slam. (Photo: Sports Illustrated via Getty Ima/Tony Triolo)
[H3] Origins of the Wimbledon White Sebra Dress-Code [/H3]

Held since 1877, Wimbledon enforces a ‘dress code’ which is quite strict for the players who participate. Only all-white clothes may be worn, including shoes and accessories.

“There should be no thick lines or colored panels. The line around the neck and arms that can be tolerated is no more than 1 cm,” reads one of the points of the dress code posted on the Wimbledon website.

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Simona Halep successfully grabbed the 2019 Wimbledon trophy. The Romanian tennis player successfully defeated the United States champion Serena Williams. (Photo: Reuters) According to The Independent, this policy is inseparable from the culture of wearing all white at tennis matches which were held as an elite gathering event in the 1800s.

Valerie Warren revealed in her writing in the book ‘Tennis Fashions: Over 125 Years of Costume Change’, at that time sweaty clothes were considered unsightly. “One of the issues that really pays attention when it comes to sweating,” he wrote.

How a woman should look is the center of the decision. He wrote, “It was hard to understand in those days seeing women sweat.”

The white shirts that accompany the appearance of Yayuk Basuki and other players at Wimbledon don’t look as drab as colorful clothes when they sweat.